Tickets for Red Shoes!

Tickets are now available for Red Shoes!

Head on over to the Fringe Website to secure your seat at my show.

Adult $15 | Student and Seniors $13

BOGO Tickets for Opening Night!

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Red Shoes

A one woman spectacle that cobbles together the dramas of losing your shoes, looking in all the wrong places, weathering the storm, and finding your wings instead.

Ticket On Sale Now

Friday AUG 17, 8:45 PM (BOGO Tickets for Opening Night!)

 Saturday AUG 18, 5:45 PM

Thursday AUG 23, 6:45 PM

Saturday AUG 25, 8:15 PM

Adult $15 | Student and Seniors $13

Pine Street Church – “The Parlour”
1237 Pine St. Boulder, CO 80302

RSVP on Facebook.

Red Shoes is my Debut One Woman Show

Red Shoes is the first solo show written, produced and performed by local Boulder artist Khiri Lee. Inspired by fairy tales such as “The Devil’s Red Shoes” and “The Wizard of Oz,” this multimedia performance riffs and coalesces into a poetic journey of losing oneself, to finding personal power, to diving deeply into creative freedom. The show magically weaves dance, improvisational theatre, video, poetry, and music, showcasing the wide variety of creative practices Khiri explores in her artistic process. Like a collage, each vignette creates unexpected connections and new thoughts around womanhood, freedom, individuality, fairytales, loss, cultural expectations, and red shoes. Khiri’s work is heavily influenced by her time as an arts educator, belly dancer, and mixed media painter. Learn more about Khiri at khirilee.com or on instagram and twitter @magick_socks. RSVP on Facebook.

The Boulder Fringe Festival

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The Boulder Fringe provides a platform for artists to showcase their artwork often in non-traditional spaces. We educate about independent art that is accessible, and affordable. We present a year round way of life capped by an annual 12-day performance art festival, that brings together local, national, and international shows and other events in Boulder.

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Day 7: White Stag

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This is another piece that took a while to finish and I decided now was a good time to take stab at completing it. I’m still not super happy with it. The whole things feels really flat and isn’t very rich. The stag only looks good when the sun hits it a certain way. I suppose it captures the elusive quality of the White Stag, which is said to only appear when the mythic realm is close to ours.

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The spray paint corner of my studio where I added the detail to the lower portion.

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Detail of the text in the trees.

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The elusive stag, with the sun hitting it just right.

Title Still Needed: Green and Gold Multimedia

I have finished all the pieces for my art show on the 29th. More on that in tomorrow’s post. This pieces was one of the two that I made as an afterthought, and strangely enough it has risen through the ranks for become one my favorites.

IMG_1365The canvas was originally just kelly green. I had a ton of leftover green paint from another painting and I was loathe to just wash it away so I used it on this canvas. Later I realized that with the right application it could become the perfect backdrop for the green and gold shrine I had created on the left. To tie the canvas and the shrine together I added teal liquid acrylic and gold patterning to the canvas. I also added the dancing figures. I have been wanting to use the image of the dancing figures since I first came across the source material. The shapes, colors, and mood of the piece really evoked a sense of Irish Folklore for me and I felt the dancing woman captured that theme. All and all I’m very happy with the piece.

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Here are some images of my process for those who are curious. And for me to refer to in the future. ^_^ And if you think you have a great title leave it in the comments! Thanks.

 

Finally Finished: Red in the Woods

 

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I can’t believe I finally finished this piece!

It has been floating around in my head unfinished for a very long time. I’ve liked the idea of the little red riding hood story for a long time. Last september after Burning Man at Turning the Wheel’s Sound Dance Workshop I came up with a composition. I pictured three wolves at the top with Red coming towards them. I had two large canvases that I had been holding onto for almost a year that would work well for the piece. However I didn’t start the painting until I moved to Chicago earlier this year. Here are the initial sketches for the painting:

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I followed the steps I outlined in the second sketch pretty closely. I created a background with paint and texture. I painted on my figures, and then I embellished the piece. I struggled a long time with the center of the composition to get it to feel unified. I think I might revisit this idea again in the future and see if I can get something closer to what I originally had in my head. Like the original sketch remarks, I think watercolor may have more of the effect I wanted.

Step 1: Background- Paint, Paper, Texture

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Step 2: Figures- Wolves and Red

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Step 3: Embellish- Create Depth, Add Sparkle

I used this table cloth to create the pattern on Red's cloak

I used this table cloth to create the pattern on Red’s cloak

 

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Everything painted in except the hand and lantern.

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Added more texture, painted lantern, created depth on the wolves.

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Added the lights to the lantern. It really brought the two halves of the painting together.

Pushing the (h)Edge

Gallery Review from Topics in Installation Art, 2011

Some artists discover their medium over a lifetime of work, others stumble into it unknowingly, and few fall in love at first sight. Kim Dickey knew she wanted to work with ceramics after finding it in sixth grade.

As small but astonishingly skilled hands turned the lump of clay into a two-handled vase, something remarkable happened. “It was like I fell in love,” she says two decades later. Even strangers saw it. “People actually remarked that I looked different. I had a glow about me. They asked if I had been in Florida.” (Dickey)

Dickey had a quick rise into the ceramics world, being represented by the Garth Clark Gallery in New York when she was still in school. Her works sold quickly, and she was in high demand without access to the materials she needed, like a kiln. Although extremely young the pressure pushed her to succeed. Dickey had just been hired by the University of Colorado when the Rule Gallery found her exciting and innovative sculptures. They have represented her ever since.

Dickey’s work walks the fine line between nostalgic narrative and modernism. The magic is in the simplicity of her work. Although highly detailed, each sculpture always contains thousands of little parts; the overall feeling is always calm and undemanding. Her work is so subtle in some cases that it can almost be overlooked. Gardens are often the subject of her sculptures placing childhood memories of hedge gardens side by side with minimalist forms.

She likes to work with the familiar, but insists her concepts are too layered in meaning to be described as merely representational. While Dickey shies from the label of whimsical, there is clearly a sense of humor present. She likes to poke fun at what she calls the self-seriousness of minimalism. (Deam)

Dickey’s installation at the Rule Gallery in March, “All is Leaf,” embodies the hallmarks of her work.

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“All is Leaf’ was designed specifically for the long, thin space of the Rule Gallery. Eleven unique sculptures are placed throughout the space, guiding the viewer through the fantasy garden Dickey has created. Eight large green sculptures pay homage to minimalist forms, including long rectangles along the floor, a large half arch, and L- shaped beams. While clearly drawing their shapes from minimalism they also mimic the architectural construction of a hedge maze. The other four sculptures are small and white, taking the shape of familiar garden characters; a lion, a running rabbit, a hawk, and a small round bush. Every sculpture is covered in thousands of identical leaves, glazed green and white respectively.

Like many of Dickey’s previous pieces, the two types of leaves used here are not meant to be botanically correct. Instead, they are take-offs on the stylized leaves, such as the quatrefoil, found throughout decorative-arts history. (MacMillan)

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Dickey is frequently exploring themes of nature and culture, her medium of clay being the ultimate bridge between the two opposing ideas. Clay being made of the earth means it inherently references earth, and Dickey likes to play off this association in her own art. “It thus straddles the seeming opposition between nature and culture, analogous to the logic of the garden, (Rule).” Clay is also the cornerstone of culture, ceramics often being the first indicator of an advancing civilization. Dickey explains the importance of clay extensively to her students, stressing its place in culture and art;

[Clay] is the stuff of the earth. Once it is fired, it becomes a cultural object. We interpret cultures through their ceramic objects. It’s permanent and impermanent, and that also could be the garden we’re talking about. (from “The Rocky Mountain News” June 14 2007)

Gardens embody the realm between nature and man as well, by taking nature into the constructed confines of the man made. In some ways there is nothing natural about a garden at all with the strict organization of hedges and flower beds. Dickey takes this a step further by removing nature all together making the mimicry complete. However, because she uses clay instead of paint or other materials, some acknowledgment of nature is still present.Gardens are often a starting point for people to interpret their own personal history. For Dickey they played an important role in own her childhood. “Her earliest memories are of scooting along the ground as her mother worked her magic on lavish backyard gardens, (Deam).” The playfulness inherent in the garden imagery immediately pulls up stories from everyone’s youth:

Formal gardens exist as much in our imaginations as they do in reality. With their secret nooks, fantastical naturalism and unexpected vistas, these impeccable oases have long sparked mystery, romance and flights of fancy. They have played key roles in everything from “Alice in Wonderland” to Jane Austen novels. (Macmillan)

 
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The white rabbit sculpture is especially evocative of Wonderland, and the lion conjures up imagery from “The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.” Even the size of the sculptures enforces an idea of childhood. The Arch in the first sculpture you see as you enter and it is clearly too small for a full sized adult to pass through. One would have to crouch to go through it. The sculpture cuts the gallery in half, obscuring the back half. This gives the installation feeling of adventure, mystery, and secrecy; its almost as if some secret from the past could reveal itself amongst the sculptures.

The childish nostalgic feeling of the installation is kept from being overwhelming by the strict geometric forms. Clearly drawing from minimalism, anyone with a knowledge of art history can’t help but think of Robert Morris’s 1964 exhibition. “He displayed then-radical works derived from basic construction components, such as an L beam or plank, (Macmillan).” Dickey uses some of the exact same shapes from Morris’s installation in her own work. Unlike traditional minimalist sculpture, Dickey’s installation flaunts its adornment. Traditional minimalism revels in the simplicity of a cube or rectangle. This aesthetic is completely ignored in “All is Leaf” with every sculpture being completely covered in ceramic leaves. Without the detail of the leaves much of the charm would be lost.

This installation was a definite must see, and although simple at first glance it is layered with meaning.

Dickey’s work evokes a sense of wonder and playfulness seen in the best of post-modernism. Her sculptural gardens engage the viewer on many levels from pure, aesthetic pleasure through to the metaphysical, religious and social semiotics of gardens and food. (Garson)

Every detail of the installation is highly considered. No leaf is left unturned, reaffirming Dickey’s place in the ceramic world. Her quick rise to fame alongside this remarkable set of sculptures makes it clear the Kim Dickey deserves to be as highly regarded as she is.

 

Bibliography:

  1. Campbell, Michele. “Kim Dickey.” RULE Gallery. Web. 17 Apr. 2011. <http:// http://www.rulegallery.com/>.
  2. Deam, Jenny. “MORE THAN A PRETTY POT – Ceramic Artist Kim Dickey a Study in Contrasts.” Welcome to Denver Woman Magazine Online! Web. 17 Apr. 2011. <http://www.denverwoman.com/1008/arts1.html&gt;.
  3. MacMillan, Kyle. “Art Review: Kim Dickey’s Gardens of the Mind at Rule Gallery.” Colorado Breaking News, Sports, Weather, Traffic – The Denver Post. 11 Feb. 2011. Web. 17 Apr. 2011. <http://www.denverpost.com/art/ci_17343412&gt;.
  4. “Meet the Speakers- Kim Dickey.” Australian Ceramics Triennale. Ed. Shannon Garson. 26 May 2009. Web. 17 Apr. 2011. <http:// australianceramicstriennale.blogspot.com/2009/05/meet-speakers-kim-dickey.html>.

 

Image Credits:

  1. http://denverarts.org/local_exhibits/rule_kim_dickey_all_is_leaf
  2. http://www.denverpost.com/ci_17343412
  3. http://www.westword.com/2011-02-24/culture/kim-dickey-all-leaf-rule-gallery-review/2/

A Week in Review: California Sun (Part 1)

Two weeks ago I took a break from my blog to do a weeklong performance project with Turning the Wheel  in Los Angeles, CA. I had never been to California before the trip and I was eager to see what all the hubbub was about.

When I arrived in LA I found myself to be staying in a beautiful home filled with books on art. Wonderful! I spent my first morning perusing Milk & Honey: Contemporary Art in California by Justin Van Hoy.

The book covered a variety of different artists working and living in California at the time the book was written. The main themes I found California artists to be working with are the quality of light, the variety of landscapes found near Los Angeles, and traffic. I liked the cover a lot, with all the butterflies, but apart from that most of the art within failed the capture my attention.

Monday night we visited a fantastically fun restaurant – Cafe Gratitude. The food at the restaurant is deliciously prepared and you can feel good about eating it because its all vegan. My favorite part about the food was ordering it. All the meals are given uplifting names and when you order them you become them. I was humble, elevated, and irresistible. Along with the uplifting atmosphere was some great art. My favorite work was a stunning mural found in the ladies bathroom. I wish I had ventured into the men’s to see if it was as wonderfully decorated.

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I liked the level of detail as well as many of the motif’s. When went to learn more about the artist Jon Marro I found some interesting things. His bio states that his work

“Currently is inspired by the teachings within Pneuma System, a path of synthesis, which brings together the inner wisdom of the major traditions of the world.  This knowledge illuminates a path of Solar Art – giving form to light and providing a sanctuary for the eyes…which I am now remembering.”
 

He calls his style shown above, Solar Art. Each line he draws gives form to his vision, like the sun – hence the name for his art style. Marro’s spiritual art is a great fit for the bathroom of a restaurant called Cafe Gratitude. Part of why the mural caught my attention so much was because it pulled together a lot of themes that I like to play with in my own art; whales, frog princes, butterflies, mandalas, intricate lines. It also made me wonder why I like those motifs. Is it because I see them all the time in popular culture, or is it because they resonate with the world today… or possibly a bit of both. It also made me consider branching out from common themes and discovering something fresher.

Barely into my week I had already seen a lot of great art, and as the week continued I got to play with bringing my own art to California. Check back soon for Part 2.

 

Profound Gateway: Bold Doors Entry

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Doorways are inherently magical and you can see their power
mirrored in our language. We stand at the threshold whenever we
reach a right of passage, pass through the gates to all things new
and unknown, then close the door on the past. These metaphors
link together life, death, and creativity which are all held in the
transitional space of doorways. This piece became a place for me,
as an artist, to meditate the meaning of these sayings and the
power they hold.

For my door I wanted to play with the passage of time and in my original sketch I conceived of a maiden/ mother nature figure on one side, and a crone figure on the other. I was unsure of how to include the window, but when I found my heavy purple door at the resource yard I knew it was the one I wanted to work with.

I thought turning the glass into a cave was appropriate because it made me think of passageways, wombs, time travel, and other images that fell within the theme I was wan’t to explore. I ended up using wax to create the stalactite affect on the glass, and then I embellished with beads. The other materials used on my door were Basic Acrylics, found paper and fabric, ModPodge, and ducting tape.

Considering the amount of time I gave myself to complete my rather ambitious vision (a week) I’m pleased. However I knew about and had entered the competition weeks in advance so I should have had plenty of time to complete my concept. School and travel ate up my time instead. All things considered I’m pretty pleased with my first solo step into the professional art world of Boulder.